Choosing the right wheel and tire

Trying to find the right wheel for your vehicle, terrain or application?  

We can help with that. Because we too know the difficulty in choosing the right wheel or tire for our vehicles. Seriously, every year the list of options gets bigger. And, if you are into following the latest trends, well those change on a regular basis as well.

Hopefully we can help narrow it down a bit: For the most part, it really starts by knowing what application your vehicle has.

Bolt Pattern: What bolt pattern does your year, make and model have. Assuming it is still running stock hubs. If not, and you have gone to the wild side, and your rig is now completely built, what is the bolt pattern for it now? Your bolt pattern is going to narrow down your search to the specific wheel that will bolt (lug nuts) onto your hub.

Backspacing & Offset: Knowing what backspacing and offset your vehicle has, or can handle without rubbing on your fender wells for example, may be your next step. Backspacing and offset will determine how far inward, or outward from the center of your hub, the wheel will be. Also known as “stance”. Offset is the amount (usually measured in millimeters) of distance that the mounting surface of the wheel is away from the center-line of the wheel.

In layman’s terms, with a negative offset (-47mm) your wheel will stick out further from the vehicle, giving you a wider stance. A positive (+12mm) will do the opposite, putting the wheel closer toward the vehicle.

Wheel Diameter: Diameter can play a factor in your decision. Especially if you are thinking about going with a different size wheel. Manufactures build to demand. If the demand is for a 17″ diameter wheel (currently is) versus a 16″ diameter, you will have more options for the 17″.

The 17″ is a common size for today’s off-road enthusiasts, as well as competitive racers.

Wheel diameter plays an important role with style and look. Over the years, we have seen larger size wheels being more common on trucks that are going for the tricked-out look, ya know, rolling on 20s. Maybe it’s 24s now… I might be a bit old school.

Other Factors: There are certainly other factors to consider, including cost, strength, weight, aesthetics, width, and where to buy, which is a given… Reno Off-Road (Parts & Accessories), I know a guy. 

The above basic info info should help you narrow down your search, by helping you search for wheel that fits your application. Below we will give you the vehicles pattern charts and a great article on choosing the type of wheel you want or need.

What Next? Maybe you are trying to decide if you want steel, cast-aluminum or forged-aluminum.

How About Beadlocks? Do you treat it like you stole it, or compete in rock, desert or other competition racing, and need a beadlock to get you to the pits if / when you shred a side wall?

Shameless plug. In 3, 2, 1, Reno Off-Road www.renooffroad.com sell them all.

HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR BOLT PATTERN, BACKSPACE OFFSET AND MORE. 

Jason Baden (yeah, that’s me) has provided a detailed breakdown below. With the help of crawlpedia.com. Jump right to it on our site > Wheel Bolt Pattern, Backspace and Offset Guide

Most Common Bolt Patterns

Most Common Lug Nut Types

lug-nut-types-common.jpg

While most people are familiar with standard 60 degree tapered acorn style lug nuts, many full size trucks with hub-centric wheels use flat flange style nuts and smaller lightweight vehicles like buggies and UTVs often use ball style lugs.

Lug Nut Torque Specs

Bolt Pattern Measurement Guide
bolt-pattern-measurement-guide.jpg
Bolt patterns with an even number of lugs are measured from bolt center to bolt center while 5 lug bolt patterns are measured from the top of the upper lug to the center of the lower lug. To find your bolt pattern, measure the distance as accurately as possible and then find the corresponding bolt pattern in the conversion table below. For example, if you have a 5 lug wheel and your measurement is 5" then your bolt pattern is 5 x 5" (5 x 127mm).

Bolt Pattern Conversion Chart

Wheel Backspacing & Offset Conversion Chart

backspacing-offset-chart-guide.jpg

Wheel Dimension Guide
wheel-dimension-guide.jpg

Bolt Patterns Listed By Vehicle
Chevy and GMC Trucks and SUV Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
1/2 Ton Blazer, Jimmy, Suburban (2WD) ’71-’91 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 78.1mm
1/2 Ton Blazer, Jimmy, Suburban (4X4) ’71-’91 6 x 5.5″ 7/16-RH Nut 108mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Blazer, Jimmy ’71-’91 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Blazer, Jimmy ’71-’91 6 x 5.5″ 7/16-RH Nut 78.3mm
1/2 Ton Blazer, Suburban, Tahoe (2WD) ’00 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
1/2 Ton Blazer, Suburban, Tahoe (4×4) ’92 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Blazer, Jimmy ’00 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks (2WD) ’67-’87 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks (4X4) ’67-’87 6 x 5.5″ 7/16-RH Nut 108mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks (2WD) ’67-’87 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks (4X4) ’67-’87 6 x 5.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks (2WD) ’88-’98 5 x 5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks (4×4) ’88-’98 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks ’99 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks (2WD) ’88-’98 5 x 5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks ’99 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 1/2 Ton Trucks (4×4) ’88-’98 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy & GMC 3/4 Ton Trucks ’76 & Older 6 x 5.5″ 1/2 or 14 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy 3/4 Ton Trucks (2500, K Series) ’88-’00 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 100.7mm
Chevy 2500 & 3500 Trucks (SRW) All 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 117mm
Chevy Avalanche ’02 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Avalanche 1500 ’02-’06 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Avalanche 2500 (4X4) ’02-’08 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 125mm
Chevy C1500 Truck (2WD) ’88-’98 5 x 5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
Chevy C2500 Truck (2WD) ’88-’00 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
Chevy C2500 Truck HD (2WD, 8 Lug) ’88-’00 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 116.7mm
Chevy C3500 Truck (2WD) ’88-’00 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 116.7mm
Chevy Canyon (SL, SLE, SLT, ZQ8) ’04-’08 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Chevy CK2500 & 3500 Truck (DRW) ’88-’08 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 116.7mm
Chevy Colorado, Canyon ’04 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 100.7mm
GMC Denali (4X4) ’92 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
GMC Jimmy ’95-’02 5 x 4.75″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 70.3mm
Chevy K1500 (4X4) ’88-’98 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
Chevy K2500 (4X4, 6 Lug) ’88-’00 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
Chevy K2500 (4X4, 8 Lug) ’88-’00 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 116.7mm
Chevy K3500 (4X4) ’88-’00 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 116.7mm
S-10, S-15 Blazer, Jimmy, Sonoma (2WD) ’82-’04 5 x 4.75″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 70.3mm
S-10, S-15 Blazer, Jimmy, Sonoma (2WD) ’82 & Older 5 x 4.75″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 70.3mm
S-10, S-15 Blazer, Jimmy, Sonoma (4X4) ’83 & Older 5 x 4.75″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 70.3mm
GMC Sierra 1500, Denali ’99-’08 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
GMC Sierra 2500 ’99-’08 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 116.7mm
GMC Sierra 3500 ’99-’08 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 116.7mm
Chevy Suburban (2WD) ’71-’91 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Suburban (4X4) ’71-’91 6 x 5.5″ 7/16-RH Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Suburban 1500 HD ’00-’08 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Suburban K2500 (4X4) ’88-’99 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 117mm
Chevy Suburban, Tahoe, Yukon (2WD) ’00 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Tahoe, Yukon (2WD) ’92-’99 5 x 5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
Chevy Tahoe, Yukon ’92 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Tahoe, Yukon (2WD) ’92-’99 5 x 5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Tracker ’98 & Older 5 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 108mm
Chevy Trailblazer (EXT) ’02 & Older 6 x 5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 78.3mm
Chevy Yukon 1500 (Hybrid) ’00-’08 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
Chevy Yukon ’92-’99 5 x 5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm
Chevy Yukon 2500 3/4 Ton (XL) ’00-’06 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 116.7mm
Chevy Yukon Denali 1500 ’92-’08 6 x 5.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 78.1mm


Dodge Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Dodge 1/2 and 3/4 Ton Trucks ’79-’93 5 x 5.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 77.8mm
Dodge 1/2 Ton Pickup and Van ’49-’70 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Dodge 1/2 Ton Pickup and Van ’71-’85 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Dodge D-50 & RAM-50 (Turbo Diesel) ’79-’93 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Dodge Dakota ’05 & Older 5 x 5.5″ 9/16-RH Nut 77.8mm
Dodge Dakota and Durango ’91-’03 6 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Dodge Dakota and Durango ’91-’04 6 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Dodge Dakota ’05-’08 5 x 5.5″ 9/16-RH Nut 77.8mm
Dodge Dakota(LE, HD) ’87-’90 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Dodge Dakota ’87-’90 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Dodge Ram 1/2 Ton Trucks ’94-’01 5 x 5.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 77.8mm
Dodge Ram 1/2 Ton Trucks ’02 & Older 5 x 5.5″ 9/16-RH Nut 77.8mm
Dodge Ram 1/2 Ton Trucks ’94-’01 5 x 5.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 77.8mm
Dodge Ram 1/2 Ton Trucks ’02 & Older 5 x 5.5″ 9/16-RH Nut 77.8mm
Dodge Ram 3/4 Ton Trucks ’94 & Older 8 x 6.5″ 9/16-RH Nut 122.5mm
Dodge Ram 3/4 Ton Trucks ’94 & Older 8 x 6.5″ 9/16-RH Nut 122.5mm


Ford Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Ford 1/2 Ton F-100 (2WD) ’80-’85 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford 1/2 Ton F-100, F-150 ’54-’96 5 x 5.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 86.7mm
Ford 1/2 Ton F-100, F-150 ’54-’96 5 x 5.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 87mm
Ford Bronco ’66 & Older 5 x 5.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 86.7mm
Ford Bronco II ’82-’90 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford Bronco II ’82-’90 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford Excursion ’00 & Older 8 x 170mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 124.9mm
Ford Excursion ’00-’02 8 x 170mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 124.9mm
Ford Excursion ’03-’05 8 x 170mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 124.9mm
Ford Expedition ’97-’00 5 x 135mm M12 X 1.75 Nut 87mm
Ford Expedition ’97-’00 5 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford Expedition ’01-’02 5 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford Expedition ’03 & Older 6 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford Expedition ’03-’08 6 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford Explorer (Sport Trac) ’90-’01 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford Explorer (Sport Trac) ’02 & Older 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford Explorer (Sport Trac) ’02-’08 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford Explorer (Sport Trac) ’90-’01 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford F-150 Harley ’06-’08 6 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 ’97-’00 5 x 135mm M12 X 1.75 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 ’97-’00 5 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 ’04 & Older 6 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 (’04 Heritage) ’01-’04 5 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 (’04 Heritage, Lightning) ’99-’04 5 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 (2WD) ’01-’03 5 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 (4X4) ’97-’00 5 x 135mm 12 X 1.75 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 (4X4) ’01-’03 5 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 (XLT FX4 Lariat) ’04-’08 6 x 135mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 (XL, Heavy Duty) ’04-’07 7 x 150mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-150 (XL, Heavy Duty) ’04 & Older 7 x 150mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 87mm
Ford F-250 & F-350 Super Duty ’99-’04 8 x 170mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 124.9mm
Ford F-250 & F-350 Super Duty ’88-’97 8 x 6.5″ 9/16, 1/2 Nut 124.9mm
Ford F-250 & F-350 Super Duty ’99-’04 8 x 170mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 124.9mm
Ford F-250 & F-350 Super Duty ’05-’08 8 x 170mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 124.9mm
Ford F-250 & F-350 Super Duty (DRW) ’88-’98 8 x 6.5″ 16-Sep Nut 124.9mm
Ford F-250 & F-350 Super Duty (DRW) ’99-’07 8 x 170mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 124.9mm
Ford F-250 & F-350 Super Duty (DRW) ’06-’08 8 x 200mm M14 X 2.0 Nut 160mm
Ford F-250 & F-350 Super Duty (DRW) ’04 & Older 8 x 170mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 124.9mm
Ford F-350 Harley Davidson ’05-’08 8 x 170mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 124.9mm
Ford Ranger (2WD) ’81 & Older 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford Ranger (2WD) ’81-’08 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford Ranger (4X4) ’73 & Older 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Ford Ranger (4X4) ’83-’08 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm


Hummer Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Hummer H1 All 8 x 165mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 117mm
Hummer H2 ’03-’08 8 x 6.5″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 117mm
Hummer H2 ’03 & Older 8 x 165mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 117mm
Hummer H3 (H3X, Alpha, Luxury) ’06-’08 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 100mm


Isuzu Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Isuzu Trooper ’92-’03 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Isuzu Trooper ’92-’96 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Isuzu Trooper II ’84-’91 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Isuzu I-280, I-290, I-350, I-370 Pickup ’06-’08 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 100mm
Isuzu Pickup ’80-’96 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm


Jeep Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Jeep Cherokee, Grand Wagoneer ’74-’92 6 x 5.5″ 7/16-RH Nut 108mm
Jeep All Models, CJ ’46-’85 5 x 5.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 108mm
Jeep Cherokee ’80 & Older 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Cherokee, Wrangler ’80-’06 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Commanche, Chief ’80-’93 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Commander ’06-’08 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Compass ’07-’08 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 67.1mm
Jeep Grand Cherokee ’93-’98 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Grand Cherokee ’99 & Older 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Grand Cherokee ’93-’98 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Grand Cherokee (SRT8) ’99-’08 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Cherokee, Grand Wagoneer ’74-’92 6 x 5.5″ 7/16-RH Nut 108mm
Jeep Liberty ’08 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 67.1mm
Jeep Liberty ’02 & Older 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Liberty ’02-’07 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Patriot ’07-’08 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 67.1mm
Jeep Prospector ’08 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 67.1mm
Jeep Wrangler ’80-’06 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Wrangler ’07 & Older 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm
Jeep Wrangler (Sahara, Rubicon) ’07-’08 5 x 5″ 1/2-RH Nut 71.5mm

Kaiser Military Trucks Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Kaiser 2.5 Ton (Rockwell Axles) All 6 x 8.750″ 3/4″-16 Nut


Land Rover Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Land Rover LR2 ’08 5 x 4.25″ M14 X 1.5 Nut 63.4mm
Land Rover Freelander (SE, SE3) ’02-’05 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 64.1mm
Land Rover Discovery, Discovery II ’99-’04 5 x 120mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 72.56mm
Land Rover LR3 (SE, HSE) ’05-’08 5 x 120mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 72.56mm
Land Rover Range Rover ’96-’02 5 x 120mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 72.56mm
Land Rover Range Rover (HSE, S/C) ’03-’08 5 x 120mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 72.56mm
Land Rover Range Rover (Sport, HSE, S/C) ’06-’08 5 x 120mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 72.56mm
Land Rover Discovery ’99 & Older 5 x 120mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 72.56mm
Land Rover Range Rover ’92 & Older 5 x 120mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 72.56mm
Land Rover Range Rover ’99-’02 5 x 120mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 72.56mm
Land Rover Freelander ’02 & Older 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut
Land Rover Defender, Discovery, Range Rover ’99 & Older 5 x 6.5″ M16 X 1.5 Nut

Mazda Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Mazda 2600 Pickup ’77-’93 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Mazda B-2000, 2200, 2300 Pickup ’77-’93 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Mazda B-2000, 2200,2300,2600 Pickup ’77-’93 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Mazda B-2500, 3000, 4000 Pickup ’93 & Older 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Mazda B-2500, 3000, 4000 Pickup ’93-’08 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm
Mazda Pickup ’93 & Older 5 x 4.5″ 1/2-RH Nut 70.3mm


Mercedes Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Mercedes G-Wagon All 5 x 130mm M14 X 1.5 Bolt 84.1mm


Mitsubishi Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Mitsubishi Montero ’83-’00 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Mitsubishi Montero ’92-’06 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Mitsubishi Montero ’01 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 67.1mm
Mitsubishi Montero Sport ’92 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Mitsubishi Montero Sport ’92-’04 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Mitsubishi Raider (LS, Durocross) ’06-’08 5 x 5.5″ 16-Sep Nut 77.8mm


Nissan Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Nissan Armada ’04 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 78mm
Nissan Armada (2WD, 4X4) ’04-’08 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 77.8mm
Nissan Pathfinder ’87-’04 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Pathfinder ’05 & Older 6 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 66.1mm
Nissan Pathfinder (2WD, 4X4) ’87-’04 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Pathfinder (LE, S, SE, XE ) ’05-’08 6 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 66.1mm
Nissan Pathfinder Armada ’04 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Xterra ’00 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Xterra (2WD, 4X4) ’00-’04 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Xterra (2WD, 4X4) ’05-’08 6 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 66.1mm
Nissan Frontier (2WD) ’87-’96 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Frontier (4X4) ’87-’96 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Frontier ’98 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Frontier (Nismo, LE, SE, XE) ’05-’08 6 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 66.1mm
Nissan Frontier (SC, SE, SVE, XE) ’98-’04 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Pickup ’73-’86 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Pickup (2WD, 4X4) ’73-’86 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 100mm
Nissan Titan ’04 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 78mm
Nissan Titan (LE, SE, XE, LE, W, PRO 4X) ’04-’08 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 78.1mm

Suzuki Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Suzuki Samurai ’86-’93 5 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 108mm
Suzuki Sidekick ’89-’96 5 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.25 Nut 108mm
Suzuki Sidekick ’96-’97 5 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm

Toyota Trucks and SUVs Year Bolt Pattern Stud Size Lug Style Center Bore
Toyota Sequoia ’08 5 x 150mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 110mm
Toyota Landcruiser ’69-’92 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota 4-Runner ’86-’02 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Landcruiser ’93-’97 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Landcruiser ’98 & Older 5 x 150mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 110mm
Toyota Landcruiser ’98-’08 5 x 150mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 110mm
Toyota 4-Runner ’00 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Highlander ’01 & Older 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 60.1mm
Toyota Sequoia ’01 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Sequoia (2WD, 4X4) ’01-’07 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Toyota Highlander Hybrid ’01-’08 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 60.1mm
Toyota 4-Runner (V6, V8) ’03 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota 4-Runner (V6, V8) ’03-’08 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota FJ Cruiser ’07-’08 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 108mm
Toyota Pickup (2WD) ’80-’95 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 60.1mm
Toyota Pickup (4×4) & 4-Runner ’80-’95 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota T-100 ’93-’96 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Tacoma (4X4, Pre-Runner) ’95 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Tacoma (2WD, Not Pre-Runner) ’95-’04 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 60.1mm
Toyota Tacoma (2WD, 4X4, Pre-Runner) ’95-’04 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Tacoma (2WD, Not Pre-Runner) ’95-’97 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 67.1mm
Toyota Tundra ’99 & Older 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Tundra (2WD, 4X4) ’99-’06 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Tacoma (2WD, 15″ Wheels) ’05-’08 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 60.1mm
Toyota Tacoma (2WD, 16″ Wheels) ’05-’08 6 x 5.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 106mm
Toyota Tacoma (X-Runner, W, OE 18″) ’05-’08 5 x 4.5″ M12 X 1.5 Nut 60.1mm
Toyota Tundra (2WD, 4X4) ’07-’08 5 x 150mm M14 X 1.5 Nut 110mm

Above charts are courtesy of: crawlpedia.com

WHICH TYPE OF WHEEL IS RIGHT FOR YOU? Steel, cast-aluminum or forged-aluminum. Need help understanding these different types of wheels, so you can decide which wheel is right for you?

Harry Wagner, a skilled off-roader and author for many sources of off-road media has written a great article for the FOURWHEELER network and gave us permission to share it with you. If you have not met Harry or seen his articles, and photography, you need to. Check him out using the link at the bottom of this blog and follow him at Harry Situations.

Below is a copy of his article to help you make your decision.

FIND OUT WHICH WHEEL IS RIGHT FOR YOUR JEEP

By: Harry Wagner

Few upgrades make the same visual statement on your Jeep as your selection of tires and wheels. Determining which wheel material and construction to run isn’t always straightforward though. There are a number of factors to consider, including cost, strength, weight, aesthetics, diameter, width, and backspacing. The order of importance might vary from person to person, but those are usually the deciding factors when shopping for new wheels.

Steel Wheels
Steel wheels have been used on Jeeps since they were spelled with a lowercase “j.” The biggest benefits of steel wheels are that they are inexpensive and strong. You can grind a steel wheel up against a rock and the only thing you typically have to worry about is cutting yourself, not whether or not it still holds air. Should you manage to bend a steel wheel, it can typically be beaten back into shape with a hammer. Also, reinforcing rings can be easily welded on to the circumference of the wheel to strengthen it.

Steel wheels, like these from US Wheel, are strong and inexpensive, making them perfect for a dedicated rockcrawler. They are also available with shallow backspacing, which widens the track width and adds stability and clearance but also increases steering effort.

Steel wheels are stamped, and as a result, they are typically thinner than a comparable aluminum wheel, making brake fitment easier in tight applications. Steel wheels come in a variety of diameters (up to 17 inches), widths, and backspacing options, although their style choices are limited to whether you want spokes or round holes and black or white or chrome finish. If there is a downside to steel wheels, it is that they are heavy. A typical steel wheel weighs approximately 20 percent more than a similar-sized cast-aluminum wheel.

Cast-Aluminum Wheels
The price gap between cast-aluminum and steel wheels has closed in recent years, with aluminum wheels offered in far more styles and sizes than steel wheels. While rivets and bolts have become popular accessories, they are generally cosmetic, and nearly all cast-aluminum wheels use one-piece construction for strength and simplicity. The downside of cast-aluminum, when compared to steel, is that when subjected to hard impacts, aluminum will break rather than bend. In either case, the wheel will need to be replaced, but it is easier to limp off the trail with a bent steel wheel than a cracked aluminum one.

The Mickey Thompson Classic III is a cast-aluminum wheel that is available in a variety of sizes and bolt patterns. The maximum load of the Classic III is more a function of the bolt pattern than the wheel construction. The 5-lug Classic IIIs are rated at 1,900 pounds each, while 8-lug Classic IIIs are rated at 3,250 pounds each, with both using the same construction.

Cast-aluminum wheels are formed by pouring molten aluminum into a mold and machining the surface of the wheel into specification. The liquid aluminum can be poured into the mold directly (gravity cast) or under pressure (low-pressure casting), with the advantage of low-pressure-cast wheel being a more consistent density, thus increasing strength. Cast-aluminum wheels are generally lighter than a comparably sized steel wheel. Weight might not seem like a huge consideration on a Jeep with 1-ton axles and 40-inch-tall tires that is used on the trail, but lighter rolling stock (the combination of the tire and wheel) will improve acceleration and braking and decrease the likelihood of breaking axle components.

Forged-Aluminum Wheels

Forged wheels are both lighter and stronger than either cast-aluminum or steel, and if they do become damaged, they bend and can typically still limp off the trail to be repaired once you return home. So why don’t we see more forged-aluminum wheels on Jeeps? The downside to forged wheels is that they are diffcult to manufacture, and as result, they expensive. Forged wheels are also less common than cast-aluminum wheels. Both Weld and Centerline offer a full line of forged wheels, while other manufacturers such as Raceline and Fuel have both forged and cast-aluminum wheel offerings.

Fuel offers their Trophy wheel in either cast or forged construction, as a beadlock or fauxlock, to fit any budget and application. The cast-aluminum Trophy wheels are comparable in cost and load rating to traditional steel wheels in a 17 inch diameter.

Forged wheels start out as a large mass of aluminum that is formed between two dies, resulting in a density and grain structure that is stronger than a cast-aluminum wheel. Additionally, most cast wheels are constructed from A-356 aluminum, which is only about 60 percent as strong as the 6000-series alloys used for forged wheels. Forged wheels can be either hot forged, which is a faster, easier process, or cold forged, which is the strongest but most expensive, manufacturing technique.

Are Beadlocks Right for You?
Beadlock wheels are available in steel, cast aluminum, and forged aluminum. They can be manufactured as a beadlock from inception or retrofitted onto an existing wheel. Beadlocks also look really cool, which explains the number of faux beadlock wheels on the market. The advantage of actual beadlocks is that they to physically clamp the tire bead to the wheel and allow you to run single-digit air pressures on your Jeep. This provides improved floatation in the sand and snow and allows the tire to conform to rocks and other obstacles on the trail. Just like any other specialized piece of equipment, from locking differentials to winches, beadlock wheels require more maintenance than a standard wheel. They are also often not legal for use on public roads. The bolts should be retorqued after every wheeling trip and replaced if they are damaged or broken.

Unlike traditional beadlock wheels that use a ring to clamp the tire bead to the wheel, Hutchinson Rock Monsters are two-piece cast-aluminum wheels with an inner liner between the tire beads that keep the tire on the wheel at low pressure. These wheels use the same bead retention system as military HMMWV wheels, which are also manufactured by Hutchison.

Harry Wagner: Harry Situations, Freelance Writing & Photography

13th Sep 2018 Jason Baden

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